November 16th, 2011

Outburst, The Process

This is by far the most successful piece I’ve completed as yet.  I have had some wonderful comments and I have even received an offer from somebody who would like to buy it!  Of course, I will be hanging onto it for now, but it is very exciting to think that somebody actually wants to buy and own my work.

While making Outburst, I took a lot of photos for documentation.  I am going to sum up the processes and decisions that got me here.

1)

This is the origin of the idea.  It was born on a blank page in my sketchbook out of cardboard, acrylic and acetate.  I loved the effect of manipulating paint into a solid object.  After realising how so many of my paintings and art pieces seemed to be breaking boundaries, I knew I had to do something with framing an image and allowing it to burst out of the frame.  I envisaged this effect in a real picture frame, and thought about how I could do it.

2)

I bought a picture frame.  It was relatively small, but it was all I could really afford.  I also knew that I needed a lot more material which might be costly.  The frame seemed big enough for my needs and I took it to the workshop to ask about how I might go about fabricating a smash in the glass.  Martin was very co-operative and suggested swapping the glass for acrylic, cutting a hole with a jigsaw, and then melting the edges to create the energy I wanted.  Once assembled, I thought the effect looked fantastic.  I took it back to the studio.

3)

I began to create the image which would go behind the frame.  Because of the concept I had already done in my book, I knew that the image wasn’t that important as the eye is drawn to the paint coming out of the frame rather than the image behind.  It took several attempts to come up with something I liked, and here it is.  I actually worked more into it than it shows here, but you’ll see that later.  The colours all moved to the bottom corner where I wanted the burst to be.  I didn’t want to burst to be too central or symmetrical.

4)

Here are the wires I painted to put onto my piece.  They are flower arranging wires, coated in paper.  I bought two different sizes of wire.  The thicker ones, that you can see here, need a pair of pliers in order to manipulate them, but the thinner ones can be twisted by hand.  I painted a few first, but soon found that it was more effective to put the wire into position and paint it while it was attached to the frame.

5)

I attached most of the wires through a small hole in the paper.  They were bent so that they would not come out, and then acrylic was applied over the top of the hole.  Eventually, as the acrylic hardened, it acted as a glue.  I began to pierce wires through the acrylic and wrap them around other wires for support.  The result is relatively sturdy, and I think that as long as people don’t tug on the wires too hard, they will stay in position!

6) 

This was the last photo I took on my first session.  It is unfinished here, but already beginning to take shape.  I have added splatters onto the glass which seems to give the piece a lot of energy.  I decided that the piece lacked white.  The colours, bright as they were, needed some kind of highlight on them to keep the paint looking shiny and wet.

7) 

And here it is.  The next day I added more wires, more paint splatters and some white highlights to the piece.  I had it mounted on the wall.  Successful?  Definitely.  I am very happy with the way the piece looks and many people are excited and interested by it.  The only thing that I would have done differently would be to choose a larger canvas, perhaps extending the installation into a room, including paint splatters on the wall and floors.  But in the time given, and with a low budget, I’m pleased with this.

Outburst, Acrylic and Wire, 2011

The Butterfly Book

November 14th, 2011
This is the background for my installation piece. I painted two but chose this one to work further into and brought most of the lines to a single point where the paint will appear to burst through the glass of the picture frame.

I bought some paper-covered wire, some of which I have painted already and experimented with twisting them into different shapes.  These will burst through the frame towards the viewer.

Later on this afternoon I will be visiting the workshop to create the acrylic front for my frame.  I’m very excited by this project and I am enjoying the hurdles I am thinking my way over.

This is the background for my installation piece. I painted two but chose this one to work further into and brought most of the lines to a single point where the paint will appear to burst through the glass of the picture frame.

I bought some paper-covered wire, some of which I have painted already and experimented with twisting them into different shapes. These will burst through the frame towards the viewer.

Later on this afternoon I will be visiting the workshop to create the acrylic front for my frame. I’m very excited by this project and I am enjoying the hurdles I am thinking my way over.

November 10th, 2011

My teacher once told me, “The fun in art is trying to work out how to make something happen.”

And right now,  that is very relevant.

I need to think carefully about how to make the idea in my head happen.  We have been given time to develop an idea into one single piece, and my ideas are strong and clear, and the vision I have of it is remarkable.  I just need to work out how to get from a vision to reality, and I suppose that is about what art is about.  This particular piece is about letting go, exploding with the creativity I have reserved inside me just to be polite and abide by the rules, but I’m going to need to just go with whatever feels right.

I suppose that’s the technique I’m going to be drawing on - intuition.  I have to know when to ignore it and when to embrace it, and that is going to be the challenge here.

I bought a box-frame today for my piece, I thought the front was perspex but it turns out it is glass, so hopefully I’ll be able to get a perspex replacement for the front to make it easier to cut the hole into the front.

Also, I think I’m going to make a separate link on my page for posts regarding this piece: “Outburst.”

November 8th, 2011
My concept for mixed media installation, cardboard, acetate and acrylic paint.

My concept for mixed media installation, cardboard, acetate and acrylic paint.

Ideas

We have been asked to look at the techniques and themes that we have covered so far, and to develop one piece of work.  I was drawn to develop the theme of breaking out of boundaries, and have begun constructing ideas for a piece that will be a mixed media 3D installation rather than a painting.

I will hopefully be getting hold of a perspex box-frame and I will use a drill to create an open crack in the perspex.  Next, I will work on a 2d painting, most likely abstract but making good use of colour.  I will then allow it, through using material such as wire and string, to jut out into the room as though the painting has escaped from the frame and is doing it’s own thing outside the confines.

I have made a small concept model in my book that should demonstrate my ideas.

Acrylic, initial ideas for a much larger piece.

Acrylic, initial ideas for a much larger piece.

This is a display of my three favourite pieces from the thinking through drawing project.
A theme seems to be developing in my work which is about space, confinement and attempting to burst out of tight “frames”.  The three drawings I have chosen all relate to this theme.  First, the “No Entry” piece drawn directly onto the wall.  It is based on a corridor I found in the civic centre, Plymouth, which led to a door saying “No Entry.”  The scribbling technique which I applied straight onto the alls broke personal boundaries as I have quite intense fears over doing something “forbidden” or “wrong.”  Drawing directly onto the wall was something I was afraid of doing and yet was something I felt I need to do to enable me to break free of the boundaries.  This seems ironic based on the content of the drawing, “No Entry” which suggests a forbidden action.  
The second drawing, “Piles and Piles of Boxes” confronts my fear of filling a page with a drawing, or carrying on even after I believe my drawing has finished.  I wanted to stop before I added the negative space at the top of the page and the tonal drawings don the sides which seem to add so much to the depth of the drawing.  IF I hadn’t confronted the fear and stopped where I began to feel uncomfortable, the drawing would not have been finished and I would probably not have chosen it as one of my final pieces.
The third drawing, the etching, represents for me what my comfort is in drawing.  The butterflies have been neatly framed by the process of pressing the etching plate against the paper and it does look charming that way.  However I can see that the butterflies are trying to escape, and I almost want to let them spill out onto the frame and perhaps even onto the walls.  There is a sense here of the fight happening within me as I try to break out of the very boundaries I have created.

This is a display of my three favourite pieces from the thinking through drawing project.

A theme seems to be developing in my work which is about space, confinement and attempting to burst out of tight “frames”.  The three drawings I have chosen all relate to this theme.  First, the “No Entry” piece drawn directly onto the wall.  It is based on a corridor I found in the civic centre, Plymouth, which led to a door saying “No Entry.”  The scribbling technique which I applied straight onto the alls broke personal boundaries as I have quite intense fears over doing something “forbidden” or “wrong.”  Drawing directly onto the wall was something I was afraid of doing and yet was something I felt I need to do to enable me to break free of the boundaries.  This seems ironic based on the content of the drawing, “No Entry” which suggests a forbidden action.  

The second drawing, “Piles and Piles of Boxes” confronts my fear of filling a page with a drawing, or carrying on even after I believe my drawing has finished.  I wanted to stop before I added the negative space at the top of the page and the tonal drawings don the sides which seem to add so much to the depth of the drawing.  IF I hadn’t confronted the fear and stopped where I began to feel uncomfortable, the drawing would not have been finished and I would probably not have chosen it as one of my final pieces.

The third drawing, the etching, represents for me what my comfort is in drawing.  The butterflies have been neatly framed by the process of pressing the etching plate against the paper and it does look charming that way.  However I can see that the butterflies are trying to escape, and I almost want to let them spill out onto the frame and perhaps even onto the walls.  There is a sense here of the fight happening within me as I try to break out of the very boundaries I have created.

This is my favourite page in my sketchbook so far.  I think it is loud and aggressive, just like the “No Entry” sign on the automatic door that I was drawing.

This is my favourite page in my sketchbook so far.  I think it is loud and aggressive, just like the “No Entry” sign on the automatic door that I was drawing.

Lino Cut

Lino Cut