January 23rd, 2012

Capturing Moments

We have been working at creating our own briefs for this module, taking forwards the strongest ideas from our last project.  I have now put together a very interesting looking brief titled “capturing moments”, which will involve a lot of experiments in recording, cataloguing and archiving events.  The final project will result in a book containing documentation of the next few weeks.

Capturing Moments – BAFA103

“Basically, I want to look back on this time and be able to recall every single detail.”

During this project I will create a documentation of my personal life in the form of a printed book.  I will be gathering, recording and documenting thoughts, actions and items meticulously, including times (to the nearest second).

I will first experiment with different forms of documentation, including photography, automatic writing or streams of consciousness, record keeping, tally charts, graphs and meticulous description. 

I will then move on to collecting a week of this documentation on a tablecloth with a permanent marker.  I will be limited to only writing and drawing on this table cloth with the permanent marker and will not write in my diary, but straight onto the tablecloth.  After the week is over I will document the tablecloth as an artefact and then continue to document different aspects of my life in different forms.

I will be archiving present objects, and creating sentimental value where there is none. 

All these ideas will then be curated into a book, which will serve as a kind of “journal” of this moment in my life. 

RESEARCH:
Artists:
Grayson Perry
Michael Landy
Ellie Harrison

Books:
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time
Lord of the Rings
Kenneth Goldsmith
Jeff Noon – Needle to the Groove
Ulysses

December 13th, 2011
Display of my Final Pieces

Display of my Final Pieces

December 10th, 2011
This is a plaster cast, created through imprinting a locket into clay.  I was incredibly impressed at the amount of detail that came out of it.

This is a plaster cast, created through imprinting a locket into clay.  I was incredibly impressed at the amount of detail that came out of it.

Regarding the Previous Image.

I bought a little A5 sketchbook to go with “Outburst”.  After a lot of thinking, I had realised that the place that I release emotions with the least thought to boundaries is my diary, which I usually write in a very little amount of time but manage to get down my feelings almost perfectly, meaning that when I look back through I can remember each and every day and the feelings that accompanied it.  I decided that I would attempt to write something on every page in a very little amount of time, meaning that some things were desperately written to fill space, and others were very interesting.  As soon as I had written something, that was it.  

The next day, I looked through the journal and decided it was lacking, I began to tear a few pages to make it more interesting, I went with my instincts, trying not to think too much about what I was doing.  I much preferred the result, but still felt like it needed more.

I went with my first thoughts, what did the diary remind me of?  The answer was “breaking out of prison”.  So I researched famous prison escapes and included them in the journal wherever seemed right.  I covered the front and back with newspaper articles and an image of “Outburst.”

I could never have predicted the outcome of the journal, but looking through it, I feel it captures the spontaneous release of emotions.  It is an explosion of thoughts and feelings and mirrors my piece completely.

November 16th, 2011

Outburst, The Process

This is by far the most successful piece I’ve completed as yet.  I have had some wonderful comments and I have even received an offer from somebody who would like to buy it!  Of course, I will be hanging onto it for now, but it is very exciting to think that somebody actually wants to buy and own my work.

While making Outburst, I took a lot of photos for documentation.  I am going to sum up the processes and decisions that got me here.

1)

This is the origin of the idea.  It was born on a blank page in my sketchbook out of cardboard, acrylic and acetate.  I loved the effect of manipulating paint into a solid object.  After realising how so many of my paintings and art pieces seemed to be breaking boundaries, I knew I had to do something with framing an image and allowing it to burst out of the frame.  I envisaged this effect in a real picture frame, and thought about how I could do it.

2)

I bought a picture frame.  It was relatively small, but it was all I could really afford.  I also knew that I needed a lot more material which might be costly.  The frame seemed big enough for my needs and I took it to the workshop to ask about how I might go about fabricating a smash in the glass.  Martin was very co-operative and suggested swapping the glass for acrylic, cutting a hole with a jigsaw, and then melting the edges to create the energy I wanted.  Once assembled, I thought the effect looked fantastic.  I took it back to the studio.

3)

I began to create the image which would go behind the frame.  Because of the concept I had already done in my book, I knew that the image wasn’t that important as the eye is drawn to the paint coming out of the frame rather than the image behind.  It took several attempts to come up with something I liked, and here it is.  I actually worked more into it than it shows here, but you’ll see that later.  The colours all moved to the bottom corner where I wanted the burst to be.  I didn’t want to burst to be too central or symmetrical.

4)

Here are the wires I painted to put onto my piece.  They are flower arranging wires, coated in paper.  I bought two different sizes of wire.  The thicker ones, that you can see here, need a pair of pliers in order to manipulate them, but the thinner ones can be twisted by hand.  I painted a few first, but soon found that it was more effective to put the wire into position and paint it while it was attached to the frame.

5)

I attached most of the wires through a small hole in the paper.  They were bent so that they would not come out, and then acrylic was applied over the top of the hole.  Eventually, as the acrylic hardened, it acted as a glue.  I began to pierce wires through the acrylic and wrap them around other wires for support.  The result is relatively sturdy, and I think that as long as people don’t tug on the wires too hard, they will stay in position!

6) 

This was the last photo I took on my first session.  It is unfinished here, but already beginning to take shape.  I have added splatters onto the glass which seems to give the piece a lot of energy.  I decided that the piece lacked white.  The colours, bright as they were, needed some kind of highlight on them to keep the paint looking shiny and wet.

7) 

And here it is.  The next day I added more wires, more paint splatters and some white highlights to the piece.  I had it mounted on the wall.  Successful?  Definitely.  I am very happy with the way the piece looks and many people are excited and interested by it.  The only thing that I would have done differently would be to choose a larger canvas, perhaps extending the installation into a room, including paint splatters on the wall and floors.  But in the time given, and with a low budget, I’m pleased with this.

Outburst, Acrylic and Wire, 2011

The Butterfly Book

November 14th, 2011
This is the background for my installation piece. I painted two but chose this one to work further into and brought most of the lines to a single point where the paint will appear to burst through the glass of the picture frame.

I bought some paper-covered wire, some of which I have painted already and experimented with twisting them into different shapes.  These will burst through the frame towards the viewer.

Later on this afternoon I will be visiting the workshop to create the acrylic front for my frame.  I’m very excited by this project and I am enjoying the hurdles I am thinking my way over.

This is the background for my installation piece. I painted two but chose this one to work further into and brought most of the lines to a single point where the paint will appear to burst through the glass of the picture frame.

I bought some paper-covered wire, some of which I have painted already and experimented with twisting them into different shapes. These will burst through the frame towards the viewer.

Later on this afternoon I will be visiting the workshop to create the acrylic front for my frame. I’m very excited by this project and I am enjoying the hurdles I am thinking my way over.

November 8th, 2011
My concept for mixed media installation, cardboard, acetate and acrylic paint.

My concept for mixed media installation, cardboard, acetate and acrylic paint.